Fall 2018 DCIC Computational Archival Science Speaker Series

Announcing the presenters for our inaugural Fall 2018 DCIC Speakers. Open to all.

 


Sep. 27
Thursday

Jason R. Baron, Of Counsel @ Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP

The Importance of Being Efficient in Searching Electronic Archives (Ripped From the Headlines)

Time: 4:45-6:00 p.m.
Location: Hornbake (HBK) Library North 0302J (basement)

Summary: 

This talk is an illustration of the potential impact of computational archival science on public policy. It proposes to connect hot button policy issues in the news with the importance of implementing AI and machine learning techniques as part of an overall governmental “access strategy” – one that in the future holds the promise of providing greater citizen access to public records through more efficient, timely responses to Congressional requests, FOIA, litigation, and other investigations of all types.


Oct. 24
Wednesday

William Regli, Director, Institute for Systems Research (ISR), Professor in Computer Science @ U. Maryland

A New Type of Thinking

Time: 5:00-6:00 p.m.
Location: Edward St. John (ESJ) Learning and Teaching Center B0320

Summary:

This presentation discusses advances in data and machine intelligence and the opportunity to reframe the human-machine systems that conduct engineering and science. The challenge is how to integrate human creativity and insight with computing machinery in order to have the machines not just as our tools—but as our partners.


William Regli Talk Oct 24 5-6pm
Nov. 8
Thursday

Lyneise Williams, Associate Professor of Art History @ UNC Chapel Hill

Erasure: Glamorous Misdirections, and Technical Obliterations in Early-late twentieth Century Mass Media

Time: 4:45-6:00 p.m.
Location: Hornbake (HBK) Library North 0302J (basement)

Summary:

This presentation explores the racial implications of the digitizing and microfilming processes—which are at the center of digital humanities. These two processes distort and diminish visual representations of all people, especially Black people and people of color in widely circulated historical mass media, like newspapers. This is particularly damaging when considering the historical backdrop of denigrating images of Black people. This kind of investigation has never been a part of conversations about image translation processes, which have steadily replaced printed newspapers in libraries and archives since the 1940s in the US.

Liynises William Talk Nov 8 445-6pm